Miro Primary Colour People~Prep

Much of Spanish artist, Joan Miro’s later work is wonderful inspiration for young children because of it’s child and dream like simplicity and abstract nature. Many of his works at this time were quite surreal and imaginative that used shapes, symbols and a limited colour palette. He often used primary colours too.

We looked at the artwork “Sun Eater” or sometimes called “Imaginary Boy” by Joan Miro made in the 1950s discussing shapes, lines and colours. They found the tiny bit of yellow in the eye and we reviewed the primary colours.

Students began by drawing the basic shapes on their paper in pencil first to make sure they had the size right. They then used paint sticks in any chosen primary colour to colour the circle on the body, followed by the surrounding square, then the stripe across the eye, making sure they used the three primary colours. Because paint sticks dry so quickly, they were able to then go over their pencil lines on the head, eyes, nose and mouth before using straight vertical and horizontal lines across and down the square body.

Lesson Plan for Prep/ Foundation aligned to Victorian Curriculum with lesson steps and success criteria statements.

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Todd Parr inspired portraits~Prep

Two books by Todd Parr: “It’s OK to be Different” and “Be Who You Are” (Todd Parr website) are fabulous to explore the theme of diversity with young children. The illustrations are simple and bright, and lend themselves to this activity where Prep students choose different coloured faces, hair style and accessory to make a unique portrait, and perfect to practise cutting skills!

Prep/ Foundation Victorian Curriculum lesson plan with templates, learning intentions, success criteria, example artworks.

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Colour Change Chameleons~ Prep

Preps have been learning about ‘diversity’ and that differences should not only be respected but celebrated! We shared the book “The Mixed Up Chameleon” by Eric Carle where the chameleon wanted to be like other animals but after becoming like each one and getting mixed up, decided it was actually great being himself after all. We discussed a chameleon’s special talent of changing colours to camouflage itself.

Students followed a directed drawing of a chameleon on a piece of A4 paper, and made a ‘foil print’ with markers on the reverse: Colour with markers on aluminium foil, fine spray of water, take a print! Preps made a branch from twisted tissue paper and stuck leaves on a background paper then cut out their chameleon and glued onto the branch.

Marker & Foil print process

Foundation (Prep) Lesson plan learning intentions, success criteria, drawing guide for a chameleon, lesson activity steps, artwork examples.

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Caterpillars & butterflies ~ Prep art lesson

The theme of ‘change’ is a perennial one in primary school, and for Prep students, caterpillars to butterflies along with Eric Carle’s ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’ is a wonderful inspiration for art lessons. Last year’s Preps made painted paper caterpillar & butterfly collages which were amazing. This year in the classroom they were looking more at chemical change, so I decided to do colour mixing activities- primary colour mixing to make secondary colours.

I shared The Very Hungry Caterpillar story and we looked closely at the colours on the caterpillar. The students were given a small pieces of blue and yellow Model Magic paper clay to roll and knead together to make green. They then tore off small pieces to roll into balls, pushing only lightly together to join. Some decided to make a hump on their caterpillar. Next they were given a small piece of red for the head and a tiny bit of yellow to separate in two for the eyes.

To make purple for the antennae, they were given a tiny amount of blue and red to then roll thinly to attach to the top of the head. They just used a green texta to add dots on the yellow eyes. Brown for the legs.

Butterflies were made by using food dye in dauber bottles on a folded piece of kitchen paper. Students daubed the colours any way they liked and when opened could see the design was mirrored on the other side. (Discuss symmetry!)

The drew a half butterfly wing design and I used that to cut out the folded kitchen paper when dry. Students chose an insect body (made by Roylco), put a chenille stick through the head for antennae and I fan folded their butterfly to insert though the slot in the body.

Next step will be for the Preps to make a leaf for the caterpillar and a wire stand for the butterfly for display! Will update with a photo when done.

short video of process

Hungry Caterpillars ~ Eric Carle inspired. Prep collage art lesson

Eric Carle’s children’s books and illustrations are a delight to read to children and also a wonderful inspiration so many art projects- who doesn’t love painted paper collages?

The Prep students (first year at Primary school) were working on a theme of “Growth and Change” and the story “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” fits in beautifully. This art lesson is the first part- of course there has to be the cocoon and then the butterfly!

We watched an animated version of the story on Youtube, and I also had a copy of the book to look carefully at the pictures. We discussed how they think Eric Carle made the pictures- someone did eventually proffer that he painted paper and then cut and pasted it. We talked about how he might have got the effects of texture. I then showed them a short video of Carle making making paper, and collaging a butterfly, so they could see his process.

Making painted paper:

Students were given a tray with a dark green, an ‘apple’ green, and white. They were instructed not to actually mix the colours, but to double dip to cover their entire paper and then while the paint was wet to use a texture wand or comb to dab or scrape through the wet paint. They also did a smaller piece of paper with red, yellow and purple paint in sections. These are left to dry for the next session.

We looked at Eric Carle’s caterpillar and decided that the shape needed for the body parts was an oval. So to make a template for the caterpillar’s body, each child was given a smallish piece of cardboard to fill it with an oval shape. After checking with me that it was big enough, they cut it out and used that to trace onto the back of their painted paper as many as they could. (we folded the paper in half so they would cut two out at a time) They traced a slightly bigger head on the red paper and used the yellow to cut circles for eyes, the purple for antennae.

I demonstrated how they could glue down their ovals- we talked about arranging and overlapping- once again referring to Carle’s caterpillar. Students cut out yellow eyes, purple antennae and green circles for on top of eyes and a small triangle nose. I cut the little ‘L’ shaped feet for them from scrap brown painted paper.

Full Lesson Plan with Learning Intentions, Success Criteria, (also enlarged for display on screen or print) lesson activities, youtube video links, and self evaluation rubric.

Holstein Cow & Barn- Prep art lesson

LEARNING INTENTIONS:

To use shapes to draw a farm scene- a cow in green pasture with a red barn.

To use skills of tracing, drawing, colouring, cutting, gluing, painting and techniques of making texture.

To make red painted paper adding horizontal or vertical lines as texture for a  barn.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can trace/ draw rectangles for body & head and arrange for shape of a cow.

I can trace my pencils lines on my cow shapes in Prockey marker and colour some black patches on the cow. I can add 4 legs, an udder, ears, eyes & nose.

I can paint some paper with red paint, and while paint is wet scrape a texture comb through to make straight lines. (horizontal or vertical) for the barn.

I can use dye wash to paint sky and grass  around my cow.

I can cut a square with a semi circle or triangle roof for a barn, and glue it on my scene, halfway up on the paper, so it looks like it is further away.

Fauvist Cows~ by Prep/ Foundation

LEARNING INTENTIONS:

Students will explore the Fauvist movement by drawing a cow and and colouring with bold, bright colours.

To follow a guided drawing of a cow’s  head and use bold colours, like the “Fauves”.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can follow directions to draw a large cow’s head that fills my paper.

I can use pastels to colour in bold colours.

I can blend my pastel colour with water and paint the background with dye wash in one colour.

LESSON ACTIVITIES:

Students view artwork of this colourful cow by Claudio Malacarne (Italian artist) painted in 2008

Discuss: What do you see?

Why do you think the artist painted the cow with colours rather than looking real?

How does it make you feel?

Discuss the term “Fauve”, and show some paintings from the Fauvist period that use colour in this bold fashion.

Students follow guided drawing directions to draw a large cow’s head that fills the paper. They go over the lines in black crayon and then use water soluble pastels to colour in bright colours.

 Using a brush and water they paint over the water soluble pastel colours to blend and spread the colour to give a painted effect.

Food dye wash in one colour for the background.

Reflection: Students look at their artwork and decide which smiley face they feel about how they went with each criteria.

“The Cow Jumped over the Moon!” Prep Art lesson

The Prep students made a mixed media artwork of the cow jumping over the moon from the nursery rhyme “Hey Diddle Diddle, the cow jumped over the Moon”. The foil moon idea came from @monpetitsoukdidees and it worked really well.

They used SHAPE to help them draw parts of a cow using a rectangle for the body and a smaller one for the head, with long rectangle legs which they then arranged in a jumping action.

Two videos to watch as an introduction about the rhyme: Hey Diddle Diddle  Nursery Rhyme and the story The Cow Tripped Over the Moon.

Victorian Curriculum Foundation Lesson Plan with learning intention, success criteria & lesson activities.

Primary Colours- Alexander Calder inspired ipad art – Year 1

LEARNING INTENTIONS: To learn about the Primary Colours To learn about line and shape To learn about the artist Alexander Calder

SUCCESS CRITERIA: I can use the primary colours in a digital artwork. I can use various lines and ORGANIC shapes in an artwork. I know that Alexander Calder made artworks and mobiles that often used primary colours.

This lesson uses the Brushes App to make a digital artwork. We looked at Alexander Calder’s paintings and discussed the colours, lines and shapes used. We looked at the colour wheel to identify the primary colours.

LINES: curved, loopy, wavy, straight SHAPES: rounded and organic, circles

Students opened Brushes App to start a “new painting”. I showed them how to find or edit a ‘brush’ so they had a smooth stroke and choose black to draw various lines and some shapes inspired by Calder’s work.

They then need to add a layer (this will need to be demonstrated) Primary colours: red blue and yellow, are chosen to colour in the shapes and maybe add a shape, spiral, or line.

The outline layer is dragged on top of the colouring in layer.

Calder inspired iPad art- Brushes App

‘The Love Monster’ Guided drawing: Foundation – Year 2

This was a great remote art lesson for the younger children. I posted a link for the story on Youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIva59P4HiY&t=54s and made a video of the steps to draw the Love Monster (Prep version- no arms or feet, Year 1/2 version with the arms and feet!) I also discussed the use of PRIMARY COLOURS, red, blue and yellow, and the use of TEXTURE- using lines for the fur.

LEARNING INTENTION: To follow guided instruction to draw the Love Monster. We will use SHAPE, LINE, TEXTURE and COLOUR to complete our picture.

SUCCESS CRITERIA: I can follow the guided instruction to draw the SHAPE of the Love Monster, including eyes, mouth and a heart. I can use short LINES to add TEXTURE for fur. I can colour in using the PRIMARY COLOURS, red, yellow and blue.