Crazy Cows ~ Peter Diem inspired Year 3-4 art lesson

Peter Diem (born 1945) is a Dutch artist well known for his expressive use of colour and texture in his art. “He gained worldwide fame because of his vivid paintings and lively, colourful representations of Dutch cows.” We viewed the Peter Diem – Cows website for examples of his artworks and discussed the elements of art Diem used to make them: colour, line, shape, texture, space.

LEANING INTENTIONS:

To learn about the Dutch artist Peter Diem, who paints cows in an abstract expressionism style. To explore Diem’s techniques when making his artworks, so I can be inspired by colour line and texture when adding details to my abstract cow.

To be able to describe the elements of art in Peter Diem’s artwork.

To be able to identify the materials and techniques Peter Diem uses.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can describe a Peter Diem cow using the elements of art (colour, line, shape, space texture)- art response /Seesaw activity.

I can identify the techniques Diem uses to apply paint.

I can follow guided instruction to draw the shape of a peter Diem cow.

I can use expressive colours, lines and shapes on my cow.

I can choose a contrast colour for the background of my cow picture.

I can add details and texture to my cow by adding puffy paint lines and shapes.

I can describe the materials and techniques I used when making my Diem style cow.

LESSON ACTIVITIES:

Students viewed and discussed Diem’s cow artworks on his website. They were then given a task where they described the elements of art thy noticed in a cow painting. I used a Seesaw activity for them to respond. Here are some student examples:

We viewed some videos of Diem in action to learn about his materials and techniques, noting how he draws the cow, and methods of applying paint- brush, finger, hand, straight from the tube.

Videos about Diem and his work:

Peter Diem in Het Klokhuis #1/4 ‘Cows’ (Diem sketching a cow from beginning doing a painting then skip to 1:40min to see him drawing a cow.)

Peter Diem, the painter. US Documentary by Charles Giuliano (To see Diem’s method of painting- hands, fingers, straight from tube, etc.)

Students are shown how to draw a simplified cow, Diem style – just the outline-in the shape of a Diem painting. Students then outline in black or a dark colour crayon or pastel.

Use bright and fluorescent oil pastels to add lines and shapes and patterns, considering the features of Diem’s work. It is then painted over to fill the gaps and a contrast colour painted for the background.

The next lesson we made puffy paint with PVA glue, shaving cream and food colouring in a zip-lock bag, and mushed it around to mix the 3 ingredients. A TINY bit of one corner of the bag is cut off to enable squeezing out fluid lines of puffy paint! They could outline or add lines to their design for amazing TEXTURE.

Once complete, students reflect on their work noting (circling or highlighting) materials (mediums) and techniques they used when making their Diem style cow, as well as the best thing, and what they might change if repeating the piece.

COLLAGE COWS ~ Inspired by Elizabeth St Hilaire. Year 5/6 art lesson.

Our school was doing a “Discover Dairy” inquiry unit and so we were making lots of artworks of cows! The inspiration for this lesson was from “paper paintings” of cows by Elizabeth St Hilaire (Nelson)

“Paper Paintings” by Elizabeth St Hilaire

The students looked at some St Hilaire’s “paper painted” cows and inferred the techniques and materials they think she used.

We watched a couple of videos with Elizabeth St Hilaire talking about her materials and showing the techniques she uses.

The students then chose a photo of a chosen breed of cow to crop to a square to use for a reference to make a realistic drawing and get the shape and colouring right.

They drew a grid on the photo (digitally) then ruled up a larger piece of paper to enlarge each part of the drawing of the cow’s head.

Next they used the photo as a reference to mix paints to match to do an underpainting and make some painted paper.

The painted paper was used to collage over the “underpainting”

  • Full lesson plan (we took 4 one hour lessons to complete the artworks and evaluate) with learning intentions, success criteria, Victorian curriculum links, lesson steps, links to useful videos, and student self-evaluation sheet is on my TpT shop.

Natural Disaster: Volatile Volcanoes! -Yr 5/6 art lesson

I had seen this lesson on various school blogs using Nick Rowland’s explosive volcano artwork as inspiration for students to produce their own using some of his techniques.

LEARNING INTENTIONS:

To respond to a volcano artwork by UK artist Nick Rowland.

To make an artwork of a volcano using techniques explored in Nick Rowland’s work.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I identify materials and techniques used in an artwork.

I can use materials and techniques with paint such as splattering, flicking, dripping, blowing etc to capture the explosive nature of a volcano inspired by Nick Rowland artwork.

I can describe the process, materials & techniques used in my own volcano artwork

Explore & respond:

Students first explored his use of materials and techniques by brainstorming and listing how they think he applied the paint to get various effects. Seesaw example of student response >

Natural Disaster: ~ Bushfire ~

Year 5/6 Art lesson

I have done this lesson a few times over the years when the students are working on the inquiry topic of natural disasters in their classroom. In Australia we have had many devastating bushfires and there are always plenty of news stories and many images to view on line. After viewing images we discussed the intensity of the colour of the fire with trees, buildings etc silhouetted against it.

LEANING INTENTION:

To depict a bushfire scene with silhouetted trees, building frames, etc.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can use warm coloured paint using techniques of blending brushstrokes, dabbing etc. for a fire background.

I can use edges of cardboard to make marks on the fire background to represent silhouettes of trees, fences and building frames, etc.

LESSON ACTIVITIES:

INTRODUCTION:

The Natural Disaster of Bushfires was introduced with news coverage from bushfires (including the West Australian fires happening at the time), this video: Bushfire Disaster – Classroom – BTN and the book Fire By Jackie French.

ARTWORK COMPARISON:

We looked at two artworks, one historical and one contemporary and students completed a comparison. (Look at the title and artist, the year the painting was made, the perspective, colour, texture, realistic/abstract, details, shapes, objects, space, etc.)

PAINTING:

Students began by using red and yellow paint and painting the entire paper, mixing in on the page to make orange. Even at thus stage of the process there are so many variations in the ‘fire’ including how much they used of each colour, and the brush strokes or dabbing effect.

Once the background was reasonably dry they used cut up rectangles of cardboard iv varied lengths (like a cereal box, as long as it is not too flimsy once dipped in paint) and a few of those thin wooden blocks you get with canvases. I put out plates of black paint on the tables so they could dip the edge of the cardboard in and use it to stamp on ‘lines’ to represent trees, fences, burnt building frames. They could also scrape the card to spread the paint or scratch into the wet for various effects. At the end I added some white paint to the leftover black to use for smoke- a suggestion to students to dab the brush fairly dry before applying. The end results were so varied and powerful.

Colour and Emotion: Picasso Portraits ~Year 1-2 art lesson

LEARNING INTENTIONS:

To learn about Picasso’s abstract portraits showing different  views of facial features, including portrait of Dora Mar and the Weeping Woman.

To create portraits to show emotion in the style of Picasso.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can talk about some abstract portraits  by Picasso.

I can explore different facial features to make abstract Picasso style portraits.

I can use paint/ pastel, line and colour to create an artwork of an expressive face with two sides (each showing a different emotion) in the style of Picasso

I can use a colour to match the emotion shown on each side of the face.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

As an introduction, watch a video (see below a list of suitable videos for Year 1-2) like “Picasso elementary lesson” explaining his style and why he made his portraits this way.

VIDEOS:

Pablo Picasso: Cubist Art Lesson  – video about emotions and Picasso’s abstract portraits

Picasso’s Trousers by Nicholas Allan | Art Stories with Kids– picture story book about Picasso’s abstract art

Pablo Picasso Elementary Lesson  – Picasso bio, abstract portraits etc

Pablo Picasso: Cubist Art Lesson  Picasso use of colour- most relevant part of the video from 4:09min

View portrait of Dora Maar painting by Picasso. Discuss the colours used and the different views of the face. Next, view Weeping Woman 1937. Note the colours and emotion on the faces (Explain Picasso drew and painted a series of “Weeping Woman” in response to the Spanish Civil war and the loss and devastation- these portraits portraying a mother who has lost her child in the bombing, using colour and expression to convey feelings of anguish, horror, deep sorrow and mourning.)

Students can compare these two portraits of “Weeping Woman” by talking about the similarities and differences.

Students are shown how we can draw a Picasso face by playing “Roll a Picasso” game to choose different features. They draw some faces in their Scrap Books.

Next lesson, students choose two emotions they would like to show on either side of the face, choosing some features from their Roll-a-Picasso drawings to suit the feeling. Students draw in grey-lead pencil, firstly drawing a face shape or using a template to trace. After making a mark in the middle of the face students choose a nose to draw down from that point, then adding the line continuing up to the top of the head and below the nose to split the face in two. They add eyes, mouth hair etc. Trace over in black marker.

Talk about colours that could represent emotions. For example, yellow=happy, sad=blue, red=angry, green=calm, purple=confused. Students paint their faces in a colours to match the emotion shown on each half.

Background can paint or food dye “wash” . Students describe the emotion on each side of the face along with colour chosen to match.

Expressionism Portraits: Alexei Jawlensky inspired- Grade Prep art lesson

This art lesson is suitable for Prep students (adaptable to Year 1 & 2) and I loved the way the artworks turned out. The use of colour is stunning! It will take 2-3 lessons depending on the class time allotment. I have hour lessons, so two and a bit of the next lesson gave enough time to discuss, explore, reflect and share.

Alexei Jawlensky (born 1864, died 1941) was a Russian Expressionist painter, (moved to Germany in 1896 and was a founding member of the New Munich Artist’s Association.) He is known mostly for his portrait art of heads and the use of bold, contrasting colours and strong directional brushstrokes.

The students viewed artworks by Jawlensky, describing what they saw, discussing use of colour, style of art, feelings conveyed.

‘Head’ 1910 by Alexei Jawlensky, pictured left, could be used on a platform like Seesaw for students to record their description and thoughts about the artwork, which can be used to assess the achievement standard at Level F in the Victorian Curriculum: “Students identify and describe the subject matter and ideas in artworks they make and view.”

LEARNING INTENTIONS:

To learn about Russian artist Alexei Jawlensky so I can use the ideas to make my own portrait.

To identify and describe subject matter and ideas in artworks.

To explore and use techniques and materials with water soluble pastels and chalk pastels to express my observations and ideas.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can describe an artwork, talking about the subject matter, elements of art, like colours, feelings conveyed.

I can draw a portrait of my face (head and shoulders) using a mirror to copy my features.

I can use bold colours on my self-portrait in the style of Alexei Jawlensky.

I can colour in patches of bold colours with water soluble pastels on my portrait and then use water to brush over to give a painterly effect. I can use chalk pastels to add colour to the background, blending and and smudging.

LESSON ACTIVITIES:

After discussing and describing Jawlensky’s portraits, students use a mirror to draw their face. To get them to draw their head big enough, I got them to put their hand a bit above the middle of the paper and draw bigger around it. Some students used a face template to trace around to get the size. We look at the position of eyes, being half way on their face, top of ears in line with top of eyes, bottom of nose in line with bottom of ears, etc. Everything is done in pencil first, so they can retry if necessary. We traced over our pencil line with a black ‘Prockey’ marker (permanent and waterproof).

Next lesson, students use chalk pastels on the side edge to gently lay down colour to then blend with fingertips (of course there are always some who get excited and use their whole hand or even both!)

Students then use water soluble pastels to colour contrasting colours (discussing and showing examples of what contrasting colours are) to colour “patches” or areas of colour on the face. Water is brushed is over the pastel areas to smooth out the colour, giving it a painterly effect.

For students at this age, they can reflect on their artwork by sharing with others or describing their piece on a platform like Seesaw.

Abstract Expressionism Portraits: Year 4 art lesson. Marten Jansen inspired

Students  view and describe portraits made by Jansen, discussing use of colour ,line, shape. View more info: https://prezi.com/huxyezp6dcjl/marten-jansen/

LEARNING INTENTIONS:

To learn about the Dutch artist Marten Jansen and his style of portraits

To explore using colour, shape and line to make an abstract Jansen  style portrait.

SUCCEESS CRITERIA:

I can use describe the elements of art in a Marten Jansen portrait.

I can describe the artwork of Marten Jansen – colour, style, line, shape, mood.

I can use colour, line and shape to make a portrait in the style of Marten Jansen .

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

Students view portraits by Marten Jansen. I just used “head shots”; some of his pieces are not suitable to use in primary school, eg. ‘Street walker’, ‘Solicitation’ for obvious reasons (Check out his work here: http://paintings.name/paintings.php)

Discuss different colour combinations to show emotion or create a mood. List and describe the elements of art used. Talk about various lines used (thick, thin, long, short), shapes (circle, triangles, organic shapes) and colour.

They could annotate one of his pictures individually, in a small group, or as a class.

Students work from a photo of themselves to make a line drawing. (I took photos of the students, edited them on Photoscape (like Photoshop) to change it into a line drawing, and then printed them on A3 cartridge paper. They then use colours, lines and shapes to fill it in using chalk pastels, (we used square blocks) using the edge, tip, side to produce various thickness and intensity of line. Blocks of colour can be used too, especially in the background.

Students  reflect on their completed artworks.

WWW EBI (What Went Well / Even Better If ) Reflection Questions:

Did I fill the paper, leaving only a little or no empty/white space?

Did I use a variety of line thickness?

Did I use some shapes- geometric / organic?

Are the colours generally sharp, only blended or smudged in areas for an effect?

ANZAC soldier silhouettes: Year 5-6 art lesson

This lesson requires careful cutting out for the silhouette soldiers for it to look effective. I printed out pictures of ANZAC soldiers from the internet that would be suitable as silhouettes (on A3 paper). Students cut out the ‘positive’ shapes of the soldiers to be left with the ‘negative’ background to use like a stencil for the silhouette.

Learning Intention:

To make a commemorative ANZAC day picture with silhouettes of ANZAC soldiers.

SUCCESS CRITERIA:

I can carefully cut out shapes of ANZAC soldiers from a printed out /photocopy picture of ANZAC soldiers.

I can use the negative shape as a stencil to paint in the shapes of the soldiers.

I can use chalk pastels to fill in the background around my soldier shapes, blending and smudging colours.

ANZAC SOLDIERS- Guided drawing + expressive emotion: Year 1-2 art lesson

Year 1-2 Art lesson for ANZAC day

The 25th April is ANZAC day, when we commemorate and remember the sacrifice of soldiers who fought in the First World War. This 2 minute youtube video explains ANZAC day for children to understand.

Learning Intention:

To draw an ANZAC soldier showing emotion.

Success Criteria:

I can follow a guided or instructed drawing the draw an ANZAC soldier’s slouch hat, head, shoulders and part of uniform, adding a face that expresses an emotion felt by a soldier in the War.

LESSON:

Read a story book to the children about ANZAC soldiers, suitable for young children, such as one of the following:

My Grandad Marches on ANZAC Day by Catriona Hoy & Benjamin Johnson,

ANZAC Ted by Belinda Landsberry,

ANZAC Biscuits by Phil Cummings & Owen Swan,

Simpson and his Donkey by Mark Greenwood.

There are many other beautifully written and illustrated picture story book that will help young children understand this important part of Australian history, whilst focussing on aspects of courage, friendship, honour and loyalty.

After sharing one of these ANZAC stories (youtube has many of these books read aloud) discuss with the children some of the feelings and emotions soldiers would have felt at different times. For example, lonely, missing their family or loved ones; frightened and scared that they may die or get wounded, sad, when a mate dies; etc.

Children follow a guided drawing following along step by step to draw the slouch hat, the shape of the face, neck, shoulders and shirt pockets etc. They then think about which emotion they want to show on their soldier’s face. Children could use a mirror to “try on a face” to get the right expression or examples could be drawn on the white board.

I mixed up a khaki coloured paint to paint in the hat and uniform; the face is food dye (red, yellow & a tiny bit of blue) mixed to make a skin colour.

Another example is to use pastels. The following portraits were made to be a design for a commemorative stamp, done by Year 2’s

AUTUMN BIRCH TREES: Elizabeth St Hilaire inspired – Year 5/6 art lesson

Painted paper collages of ‘Fall’ birch trees by Elizabeth St Hilaire were the inspiration for these mixed media artworks by Year 5 students. The process we used was different than that of St Hilaire, though I got the students to suggest what materials and techniques they think were used by her.

Elizabeth St Hilaire was born and raised in New England, USA and has lived in Florida for more than 20 years. She makes collages from painted, found and hand made papers, which she tears and collages to make her amazing textured and patterned artworks of landscapes, trees, animals, flowers, birds and portraits. St Hilaire does an underpainting first then uses swatches of painted and found paper in matching colours to glue over the top, giving her work a painterly finish, with the texture of a collage. We used a different process, painting the collaged newspaper after it was stuck down. For this project we looked at her Autumn (Fall) Birch trees for inspiration.

Learning Intention & Success Criteria:

To make a mixed media artwork of Autumn birch trees in the style of Elizabet St Hilaire.

I will learn about artist Elizabeth St Hilaire and view her artworks of Autumn (Birch) trees and how she shows texture and perspective in her artworks.

I am learning about PERSPECTIVE and TEXTURE so I can use collage and painting techniques to resemble  Birch tree trunks.

I can tear and glue down overlapped newspaper to cover a piece of A3 paper.

I will use masking tape to make some trunks thin, some thicker to give the illusion of depth and perspective. I can use scraped and dabbed black paint to give texture. I can choose and blend colours and emphasize texture in the Autumn background.

I can analyse artworks by Elizabeth St Hilaire by noting materials, process and elements of art.

___________________________________________________________________________________

First of all students look at the Birch tree artworks by Elizabeth St Hilaire to infer the materials and techniques. For example: Materials: paint, paper: newspaper, sheet music, painted paper, glue, etc. Techniques: tearing, overlapping, gluing, painting, collage, outlining, etc.

This is a video of an interview with St. Hilaire explaining her process and collage techniques: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9obDq-QLtA  and this one: “A peek into my Process”: demonstrates how she goes about an artwork.


Elizabeth St Hilaire: “A peek into My Process” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R69zzS9Ok3E

Our Process: (different from St Hilaire)

Collage the entire page with torn newspaper. Brush over with ‘Modge Podge.’

Use masking tape of varying widths to make the tree trunks from top to bottom of the page with some thin branches off the side.

Use Autumn colours to paint the background- could be in layers or mixed all over.

Use a thin brush to paint black paint along the edges of the tree trunks. Using the edge/side of a card, scrape paint inwards along the edges of the trunks to give tone and texture of a birch tree trunk.

Students evaluate their work with a rubric: